All posts tagged: Art and environment

Content that looks at art with an environmental component.

Mishchenko’s Macrotastic Wonders

I’m a sucker for macro photography; maybe because I appreciate how it can reveal the extraordinary in the miniscule and  mundane. Recently, I came across the work of Ukranian photographer Vyacheslav Mischenko; his macros manage to capture the whimsical wonder that is the subject of the past two Ekostories. From kissing snails on cherry stems to toadstool sentinels standing guard over patches of dewy green, Mischenko’s work illustrates that a multitude of unnoticed realities exist in parallel to our own, and can be as enchanting as our minds’ most fantastical creations. For more absurdly astonishing photos, please check out his portfolio or visit his Facebook page. Related Ekostories: The Beauty of Water Droplets, by Andrew Osokin Pikmin 3 Photography All images © Vyacheslav Mischenko.

May 2013 Styro-Buck at Ohio Falls

My Top 5 Eco-Art Tales, by the Artist at Ohio Falls

It wasn’t my intention to continue with the art theme. But as the rule of three calls and  I learn more about writing and blogging, I found myself more inclined to follow intuition than push through to produce work that doesn’t feel right. Perhaps it was just easier to showcase other people’s incredible work instead of doing research for a long piece. Given the choice between being attuned and growing lazy, I’m sticking with the former interpretation. I’ve been a fan of Albertus Gorman’s work over at The Artist at Exit 0 Riverblog ever since I began blogging in 2012. For the better part of the last decade, Gorman has used materials washed up at Ohio State Park to create sculptures and craft stories that explore the impacts we have on the places we inhabit. Some of his work from Ohio Falls is now featured in The Potential in Everything, an exhibition at the Carnegie Center for Art and History in New Albany, Indiana. In a recent post exploring the evolution of nature writing, we …

X-ray coloured tulips

X-Ray Photography of Nature, by Arie van’t Riet

Last week’s art by Greg Mort connected the intimate with the infinite. This week, I thought it would be interesting to explore art that delves into a world hidden from plain sight. With the use of  x-ray radiography, medical physicist and artist Arie van’t Riet creates stunning glimpses into the inner workings of the natural world. For me, van’t Riet’s photographs work on multiple levels. I enjoy the story of his path towards becoming an artist. In his work, I find a keen aesthetic judgement that balances an artist’s intention with the intrinsic beauty of the subject matter. Most importantly of all, I connect with his desire to showcase the vibrancy of life in his more complex pieces.

Greg Mort Stewardship Painting

The Art of Stewardship, by Greg Mort

I first came across Greg Mort’s artwork while writing a piece on Carl Sagan’s The Pale Blue Dot. The image immediately drew my eye: Two apples situated against a black backdrop, one golden and freshly unwrapped; the other painted as the Earth. Attached to the stem of the pole, a blank price tag. Stewardship, the piece was called. The image and title struck me.  It forced me to contemplate, not for the first or last time, what stewardship truly entails, what value I place on the well-being of the world that sustains all. It both broadened and deepened my innate desire to care, as art can sometimes do. With his work prominently displayed in museums, art galleries, and even the White House, I am honoured to have permission from Mort’s studio curator to feature and explore a few of my favourite works. As with other art-oriented Ekostories, I hope to let the visuals speak for themselves and allow you, the reader, the space and time to discover the stories they have to tell. So enjoy. …

Garbage Landscapes, by Yao Lu

Perhaps more of these kinds of messages, delivered through mediums that resonate deep within the Chinese psyche like Shan Shui paintings, can help broaden the debate, spark lasting awareness, and affect change on the complex issues behind most environmental problems. This is what I wrote in the Shan Shui: Environmental Art Ekostory a few weeks back. Last night, I stumbled upon the intriguing work of artist Yao Lu, titled Yao Lu’s Landscape, at barbourdesign.wordpress.com: