Entries, Non-fiction, Publication
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The Perfect Party Guest, Center for Humans and Nature

Photo by Denys Gromov on Pexels.com

Delighted to share that I have an essay published by the Center for Humans and Nature, “a nonprofit organization, publisher, forum, and place to explore, connect, and nurture our understandings of and responsibilities to the natural world.”

Titled “The Perfect Party Guest,” the piece makes the case of considering certain creatures to your next gathering/shindig, ones that are perhaps not on everyone’s radar. Here’s an excerpt:

“When deciding on whom to invite to your next gathering, be sure to extend consideration to the sloth. Either the two-toed or three-toed variety will do, for each distant relation will have unique insights to share about their suspensorial lifestyles, which is just a tongue-pleasing way of describing upside-down living on trees. These days you needn’t even worry about tailoring the invitation like you would eleven thousand years ago, when sloths of the giant and grounded species might suddenly show up at your door, not being able to fit through, and wouldn’t that be dreadfully embarrassing, having to turn away guests because the fire code for your condo common room doesn’t permit for twelve-foot tall, elephant-sized vegetarians, and even if it did, you may never live down the fact that your party might be the only one in history to ever run out of salad…” 

You can read the full piece on the “Stories and Ideas” section on the Center of Humans and Nature’s newly revamped website, or later as part of my upcoming essay collection titled Utter, Earth. If you are interested in further readings on the more-than-human world, I highly recommend picking up the Kinship five-volume series, published by the Center’s Press and co-edited by Gavin Van Horn, Robin Wall Kimmerer, and John Hausdoerffer:

Kinship: Belonging in a World of Relations is a lively series that explores our deep interconnections with the living world. These five Kinship volumes—Planet, Place, Partners, Persons, Practice—offer essays, interviews, poetry, and stories of solidarity, highlighting the interdependence that exists between humans and nonhuman beings. More than 70 contributors—including Robin Wall Kimmerer, Richard Powers, David Abram, J. Drew Lanham, and Sharon Blackie—invite readers into cosmologies, narratives, and everyday interactions that embrace a more-than-human world as worthy of our response and responsibility. These diverse voices render a wide range of possibilities for becoming better kin.”

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