Month: October 2012

Reconnect 2: Cautionary Ekostories

The cautionary tale is a good tool for raising awareness about serious problems. It is also a good place to turn to for inspiration when ignorance and indifference threatens. Sometimes we need a shot in the arm, a reminder of what is potentially at stake. But care must be exercised to not overuse them, lest we grow numb to their bleak messages and become paralyzed in taking meaningful and needed action. This week’s Reconnect brings together Ekostories that serve as warnings to a world wracked with ecological degradation and cultural destruction.

Reconnect 1: Visually Striking Ekostories

Human beings are visual creatures; our eyes and brains work in concert to extract patterns and meanings through the narrow visible spectrum. Vivid imagery can speak to us in a wordless tongue, reaching deep into our hearts and minds to make us see the world and ourselves in a new light. Because they are more open to interpretation than words, visual narratives can be less confrontational and more accessible. This week’s Reconnect highlights three past Ekostories which utilize aesthetics as a way to engage viewers to think more deeply about humanity’s relationships with the environment.

Ekostories Reconnect: A Hiatus

Hello all, I will be travelling to Nepal for a volunteer vacation for approximately six weeks. Computer access will most likely be extremely limited, as will most of the many modern conveniences I normally take for granted. This unfortunately means I will not be able to keep up with my weekly essays until I get back. Sorry about that. What I have prepared in advance though is a six-part series titled Ekostories Reconnect. Since this blog is all about exploring connections, I thought it would be interesting to group together some of my existing entries that share similar themes and ideas pertaining to nature, culture, and self. Each part will be scheduled to go live on a weekly basis.  I hope new readers will find something interesting in these older entries, while more regular readers can perceive new patterns and gain fresh perspectives by looking at things a little differently. I’ll try to respond to comments to the best of my abilities. Thanks for your support! Isaac

Red, by Ronin Waters

“Those who think Nature is a lady Misunderstand her. Those who think her graceful Have been deceived. Nature is not gentle She is not kind Or warm She is nobody’s lover….” Red, by Ronin Waters on standingoutinmyfield.wordpress.com. I don’t usually get poetry – years of habitually structured thinking has left my mind too rigid to fully appreciate the organic fluidity and raw evocative power associated with most poems. But once in a while, something clicks. This is one of those welcome exceptions. Like Larson’s There’s a Worm in My Dirt, Red reminds me that nature is not humane. The poem also succinctly explores humanity’s relationship with the Other; notions of exploitation and profound alienation are conveyed in a few simple powerful verses. I would love to hear your thoughts on the rest of the poem.

The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker

Seeds of the Future: Zelda’s The Wind Waker

Having recently celebrated its 25th anniversary, the Legend of Zelda is one of the most iconic and celebrated franchises in videogame history. What I love about the series is that it continually incorporates inspiration from various real-life mythologies into its own world. Each mainline iteration is a self-contained story, but they can all be seen as discrete reinterpretations of one central legend, a core narrative that revolves around the hero of Courage, aided by the heroine of Wisdom, embarking on a quest to prevent the villain of Power from acquiring the Triforce, a sacred artifact that grants its wielder’s desires. Two games in the series struck me as being particularly intriguing in the content and delivery of their monomyths from an Ekostories perspective. The first I’ll touch on is The Legend of Zelda: The Wind Waker, released for the Gamecube in 2003 and re-released as a HD remake for the WiiU in 2013.